Busting Contact Lens Myths

Contact lenses are a popular alternative to glasses, but many people hesitate to try them out because of common myths and misinformation. Here are six myths about contact lenses that don’t hold up to reality. Contact lenses aren’t for everyone. You may have heard that some people can’t wear contact lenses because they have a challenging prescription or a specific vision problem. However, because of new contact lens technology, almost everyone can wear contacts. You can get bifocal contact lenses, lenses for astigmatism, and custom made lenses for almost all other issues. Contact lenses can get stuck or lost behind your eye. A contact lens can stick to the surface of your eye if it gets too dry, but it can’t get permanently stuck. Contact lenses also can’t get lost behind your eye. The inner surface of your eye is lined with the conjunctiva, which turns into the covering of the eyeball. This means that it’s impossible for your contacts to reach the back of your eye. They may get stuck under your eyelid, but it’s easy to retrieve them. Contact lenses are uncomfortable and inconvenient. Contact lenses might feel strange for the first few days you wear them, but almost everyone adjusts quickly. Most people can’t feel their contacts in their eyes at all. Contacts are also very easy to take care of once you get used to the cleansing process. Contact lenses cost too much. Contact lenses are usually about the same price or only slightly more expensive than glasses. In some cases, they can be even cheaper than glasses. For many people, the benefits of contacts...

Taking a Look at Cataracts

Among conditions that affect the eyes, few have been as pervasive as cataracts. Cataracts, defined as opacities of the lens that can ultimately lead to partial or complete blindness, impact millions of people across the world: According to some studies, up to 15 million people have blindness that is linked to cataract formation. What are some of the details related to cataracts’ causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment? While the exact pathogenic process causing cataracts remains a subject for research, there is quite a bit of literature available that discusses pertinent risk factors. One theory states a photo-oxidative process leads to the damage and subsequent opacity development. Commonly cited risk factors include old age, cigarette use, exposure to sunlight, diabetes, and alcohol consumption, among others. The effects of certain medications (e.g. Statins) is a subject for discussion. The condition presents as a painless, gradual loss of vision. A patient may note that they can’t see in the dark as well as they used to. Additionally, they could be faced with challenges when focusing on fine print or attempts to read signs while driving. Color can appear faded, with a lack of richness that may have been perceived in the past. Of note, cataracts often affect both eyes, but the problems may start asymmetrically. This means that one eye (either the right or the left) may begin to experience symptoms prior to the other. An ophthalmologist who suspects cataracts based on a patient’s presenting symptoms can confirm the diagnosis with a fundoscopic exam. Treatment is essential to prevent the onset of full-blown blindness. Generally speaking, the decision to pursue treatment (which...
The Dos and Donts of Eyedrops

The Dos and Donts of Eyedrops

Eye drops are very important and have numerous different methods of used. Eye drops help replace your eyes’ natural moisture. Eye drops also helps those who have eye dryness and irritation. In addition, eye drops allow your eyes to be more comfortable overall. If you use eye drops, it is important that they are used properly. Eye drops should be applied while tilting your head back. You should focus on the ceiling when applying eye drops, so be sure to be looking up! You should use your index finger to pull the lower eyelid down. The bottle should be held at least one inch away from your eye. Then you should squeeze a drop into your eye. After you’ve done that, you should not blink; instead, just close your eye once and gently press the corner of your eye, the side by your nose. Using this technique will stop your eye from leaking the solution. When applying eye drops, do not let the bottle’s tip touch your eye. This could cause eye infections like pink eye. Also, do not expose the tip of the bottle to other surfaces, as this may introduce foreign bacteria that could cause infection. It is also important to not mix eye drops. Instead, if you’re going to apply different applications, do so at least 30 minutes apart for the best outcomes. If you wear contact lenses, ask your eye doctor or read the directions on what types of eye drops can be used while wearing contacts. If you are not sure, wait until after you’ve worn those contacts before using the eye drops. Be...
How Fitness Helps Your Vision

How Fitness Helps Your Vision

Most people are aware exercise is good for slimming down, toning up, feeling better, and remaining healthy. What most people do not realize is exercise can help preserve vision. Studies during the past ten years found connections between exercising regularly and reducing risks for numerous common eye ailments. This includes glaucoma, cataracts, and macular degeneration. Exercise combined with a good diet can also help avoid health issues that can cause damage to the eyes including Type-2 diabetes. This can cause damage to the retina’s blood vessels and cause blindness. High cholesterol and high blood pressure can additionally cause eye disease and vision problems. Both risks can be lowered with regular exercise and a healthy diet. A study conducted in 2016 stated all individuals should do everything possible to maintain the health of the eyes. The quality of life is seriously affected by blindness and vision impairment. Researchers predict as the population ages, the number of individuals with visual impairment or blindness will double by 2050. The rates are already increasing throughout the world. This can be combated with regular screenings for eye diseases. The first step to take is visiting an eye doctor regularly. An eye doctor will schedule yearly checkups, and ensure glasses have the correct prescription. According to a decade’s worth of research, exercising should be a priority. This helps decrease the risk of specific eye conditions, and offers numerous additional benefits. A study in 2013 showed running or briskly walking can help decrease the risk of cataracts related to age. There were similar findings in a 2016 study, and additional information showed not enough physical activity...
Properly Caring for Your Contacts

Properly Caring for Your Contacts

Millions of people wear contact lenses every single day. However, many of these people suffer from problems like eye infections and vision problems because they do not properly care for their lenses. Soft and hard or rigid gas-permeable contact lenses both require a great deal of work to properly maintain. When you follow the right steps to properly care for your lenses, you will have fewer problems with your eyes. Here are the best ways to care for contact lenses. Always Handle Them with Clean Hands Your hands should always be thoroughly clean before you handle contact lenses. Wash with soap and rinse your hands completely. Make sure to dry them with a clean towel that is free of lint. Be Careful with Beauty Products If you wear hairspray, you should apply it before you put in your lenses. If you are a woman who wears makeup, you should also always apply your makeup before putting your lenses in your eyes. Remove your contacts prior to removing your makeup as well. Use the Right Solution Some contact lenses require special solutions for wetting and cleaning. If you have hard or rigid gas-permeable lenses, you will also have to use a solution that removes protein deposits at least once per week. Soak your lenses in the right product and avoid using tap water. Water contains many microorganisms that can damage your lenses and lead to a myriad of eye problems if you soak your lenses in it. Likewise, never use saliva on your contacts. If you are an eye drops user, check with your doctor to see what he or...