How Vision Changes as You Age

How Vision Changes as You Age

Vision is like other parts of our bodies that feel the effects of aging, and our eyes will show signs as we meet good old father time. A lot of adults will notice changes in their late ‘50s with vision up close; this explains why you can look around a restaurant and see 50-somethings looking at their menu from afar or with reader glasses on the tips of their noses. These glasses come in different magnifications and help with making those little details or small text much clearer to see. Another issue aging eyes deal with are changes to regular vision: nearsightedness tends to change as you age as well and you may notice difficulties seeing far away. If this happens, an ophthalmologist can prescribe you glasses or increase your current prescription. Night driving is another difficulty that people complain about as they age and there are special lenses to make the glare of oncoming headlights less. Some elderly people prefer to not drive at night, but there are corrective helpers. Dry eyes, which can be extremely annoying, are a complaint of aging vision. Dry eyes happen as your eyes age because of the decrease in the production of tears. There are several reasons for this condition and it’s important to consult an ophthalmologist as soon as possible because this can affect the cornea. There is also the opposite of dry eye which is that your eyes tear too much. This could be a sign of a blocked tear duct or some kind of infection and both can be fixed by an eye professional. Older eyes may also see...
How Healthy Vision Will Help Your Child in School

How Healthy Vision Will Help Your Child in School

Along with books, pencils, and teachers, a child’s vision is a key ingredient in their education. Most children take in their surroundings visually, and poor or unhealthy vision can cause a number of problems in their learning environment. Your child may not realize that he or she has a vision problem. So, If you notice signs that your child might be having difficulty seeing, then it’s time to schedule an eye exam right away. Signs of a problem can include: Frequent complaining of headaches Excessive rubbing of the eyes Head tilting Short attention span Losing their place during reading Avoiding or omitting small words when reading The need to use a finger to keep track of words when reading If you notice these or any other signs of a problem, have your child’s eyes examined. Poor vision can cause a child to not live up to their potential. Children need healthy vision to study and excel at school. If you notice that your child is “giving up too easily” or if you get reports from their teacher that your child is not paying attention in class, unhealthy vision may be to blame. In order to learn effectively, children must have healthy vision. In the event of a problem, they will not be able to see the chalkboard clearly, they will not be able to complete assignments effectively, and they won’t be able to comprehend or retain information. By correcting any vision problems, you can help your child to better thrive in their learning environment. Children aged 6-18 need to be able to read effectively as well as take in...
How Computer Glasses Can Help with Digital Eye Strain

How Computer Glasses Can Help with Digital Eye Strain

If you work at a computer several hours per day, then you are prone to experiencing blurred vision, red eyes and eye strain. This is caused by computer vision syndrome. Computer vision syndrome often occurs because the eyes are unable to remain focused on the computer for a long time. If you are over the age of 40, then computer vision syndrome may be caused by a condition known as presbyopia. This is vision loss that is caused by the normal aging process. If you have been suffering from computer vision syndrome, then you will need to get a comprehensive eye examination. This will ensure that you do not have any serious eye conditions. You may need to get customized computer glasses. These glasses are designed to keep you comfortable while you are looking at the computer. They will also reduce eyestrain. Why Should You Use Computer Glasses? Computer glasses are different from reading glasses and regular glasses. Computer screens are typically 20 to 25 inches from the face. Prescription glasses are designed to correct vision problems such as farsightedness, nearsightedness and astigmatism. Reading glasses work by magnifying small print. Computer glasses have 40 percent less likely magnifying power than reading glasses. They will have to be customized in order to meet your needs. How close you sit from your computer and how close you hold your devices to your face will determine the type of computer glasses that you need. Lens for Computer Eyewear It is important to note that glasses that are designed for computer use are not designed for everyday wear or reading. Single vision lenses are one...
Protecting Your Eyes While Watching the Solar Eclipse

Protecting Your Eyes While Watching the Solar Eclipse

This month sees the return of a rare astronomical phenomenon. The total solar eclipse on Monday, August 21st will turn day into night from coast to coast across the United States. The path of the full eclipse will cover from Oregon to South Carolina, areas where, at totality, the sun will appear to be completely blocked by the face of the moon. Those outside of the direct path of the moon’s shadow will see the eclipse as a partial solar eclipse, but either experience will be an event that is not to be missed. The last total solar eclipse crossing the entire United States was in 1918. As the moon moves between the Earth and the Sun, the sky will begin to darken, and at its peak, celestial bodies, such as planets and some of the brightest stars, may become visible. The solar atmosphere—the corona—will also be visible, and as its name implies, a halo of light resembling a crown radiating with swirls and jets of solar energy will appear as well. In order to safely view an object as bright as the sun, special filters must be used. Looking at the sun directly with the naked eye—even for a few seconds—can cause eye damage and possibly blindness. NASA states that at the moment of the sun’s total eclipse behind the moon, it is safe to view the sun without protection, but using special eclipse filters will be necessary to know when that moment of totality occurs. Never look directly at the sun unprotected. Special disposable glasses can be purchased or ordered with dark filters specifically made for solar...
First Aid for Your Eyes

First Aid for Your Eyes

Many first aid courses focus on teaching how to treat cuts and lacerations and perform CPR, but they can overlook eye-related emergency care. Since nearly two million emergency room visits stem from eye injuries or conditions each year, the lack of emphasis on eye care represents a critical gap in first aid trainees’ knowledge—both for themselves and for others. If you want to learn more so that you can be ready to help provide emergency care for someone afflicted by an eye injury, take a look at these tips on eye-related first aid! Of course, first aid treatments for the eyes vary widely depending on the nature of the injury, but there are several universal principles to follow. The first step of any first aid procedure is to call 911 immediately so the victim can receive professional medical attention. If you need to provide treatment while the ambulance is on its way, however, wash your hands—ideally with soap and water—to prevent further contamination or infection. Additionally, never perform first aid without making sure that the area is safe, since you’ll be of no use to the victim if you get hurt, too. Bleeding or Lacerations To treat someone who’s eye is bleeding, perhaps as the result of a puncture wound or direct trauma, cover the eye with a clean cloth or an eye shield and head to the hospital as soon as possible. Be careful not to apply pressure to the eyeball, and if there is an object embedded in the eye, don’t try to remove it. Chemical Exposure Without protective eyewear, it can be surprisingly easy for workplace...

Retinal and Iris Scanning: How Does It Work?

Today, technologies that once lived only in the minds of science fiction writers are becoming commonplace in every area of our lives. For example, biometrics—or methods of measuring biological features for purposes of identification—are now widespread in all areas of our lives, whether we recognize them or not. Biometrics explain why it’s second-nature for many of us to activate our phones with a fingerprint scan or why certain devices only respond to the sound of our unique voices. One of the most futuristic forms of biometrics involves iris or retinal scanning. You might be familiar with these technologies from movies or TV shows, but how does they work in the real world? Retinal Scanning The retina is a complex web of tissue and neurons that line the back of the eye, and it plays an essential role in vision by transmitting light into neural signals that our brains process as images. Retinas are so complex, in fact, that no two individuals—not even identical twins—share similar patterns. Combined with the fact that retinas do not change throughout our entire lives (with few exceptions), the uniqueness of retinas makes them a perfect biometric marker. Retinal scans operate by shining a beam of low-energy infrared light into an individual’s eye as they look into a scanner. This beam of light “draws” a path onto the retina. During this process, the amount of light reflected will vary depending on the individual’s unique retinal pattern, and the scanner converts this pattern into a string of computer code and records it in a database. In the future, when individuals return to the retinal scanner, it...