Ocular Photography

Ocular Photography

Opthamologists are constantly using technology to gain a better understanding of what diseases are plaguing the eye. If you have ever been to the eye doctors before for a procedure then you have probably had pictures taken of your eyes. Ocular photography or external ocular photography serves a crucial purpose in diagnosing and identifying eye diseases and problems. This article will give an overview of how external ocular works and the capabilities it has to help patients and medical professionals. Equipment There is a variety of equipment that can be used during eye exams to diagnose a wide range of problems within the eye. Some basic and common pieces of equipment that you may have seen or heard of before include a Phoropter, Retinal Camera, and Slit Lamp. Phoropter – also spelled Phoroptor is one of the most common pieces of equipment people think about when they imagine an eye doctor’s office. A Phoropter is used to test an individual’s vision and identify if they may suffer from something like nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism. The Phoropter gives the doctor the ability to adjust the intensity of a lens on the fly allowing them to analyze how your vision is corrected through the different intensities. The patient plays a integral part in this because they ultimately decide what lens they think works best for their vision by answering questions from the eye doctor as they change the lens intensity. Retinal Camera – A Retinal Camera is used to view the back of your eyes including the retina and optic disk. The optic disk holds the optic nerve which is responsible...
Smart Contact Lenses

Smart Contact Lenses

Recent advancements in technology have sparked the innovation of smart wearable tech. Smart watches and Virtual Reality headsets are just two examples of very popular smart technologies that have taken off over the last few years. Smart contact lenses are on the rise and in development with many tech companies. Smart contact lenses open a plethora of doors for individuals and have a significant amount of potential to help people in various ways. Health A company called Medella Health has recently been working on contact lenses that could potentially help people identify their blood glucose level. The way the contact lens would track the glucose level would be through tears of the individual. Once the information is gathered, the micro-antenna in the contact will send a message to the individual’s smartphone with the information. The contact lens has a sensor and a chip installed in it to be able to track the information. Another company called Verily is starting to create similar smart technology for patients, but instead of it being a contact lens, the product would be an injection into one’s eye. Past and Future Information gathering smart lenses are still in the preliminary stages. We have come a long with wearable smart technology before. Smart contact lenses have helped people cure their color blindness and implementing multi-focal lenses instead of monofocal. The next step would be gathering information from the human body to determine health risks such as the  low-blood-sugar which companies like Medella and Verily are developing now. Thinking even further in the future would be to incorporate Augmented Reality into contact lenses. Augmented Reality (AR)...
The Science Behind Sight

The Science Behind Sight

When you were younger, I’m sure you were explained how people see and interpret things. Typical examples of explaining sight include referring to cameras and how they operate. Demonstrating how your eyes see and how cameras work is an effective way to help people understand vision but our vision is much more complicated than that. Receptors Our eyes are light receptors. Light is reflected off of an object which is then transferred into our eyes and processed by our brains. There are many different parts of the eye that allow the process of sight to happen. The components of a human eye are complex and deserve some explanation to understand how we see. Components The areas of the eye that we use to perceive light consist of the pupil, cornea, retina, lens, and optic nerve. All of these areas work together at incredible speeds to process information from our eyes. In the retina of the eye, millions of light receptors differentiate colors and textures of objects we see. These receptors are divided into two categories, cones, and rods. The cone receptors in the retina are responsible for determining the color of the object we are perceiving. The rods in the retina give us the contrast between light and dark. The other components of the eye that were mentioned all help the receptors in the retina perceive and take in the light. Cornea & Pupil The cornea is the outermost layer of the eye. The best way to describe the cornea is to think of it as the window to the eye. The cornea allows light to safely pass through...
Why You Shouldn’t Sleep In Your Contacts

Why You Shouldn’t Sleep In Your Contacts

If you wear contact lenses, then you may know the problems that arise from having them in too long or overnight. To most people, it is common knowledge that they should not wear their contacts overnight. Sleeping in your contacts can cause a wide array of problems starting with small, almost unnoticeable irritations to severe permanent damage. In this article, we will discuss a few issues that can arise from consistently sleeping in your contacts. Cornea Your cornea is the outermost layer of your eye and is the portion of your eye that is most in contact with your contact lenses. Consistently sleeping in your contacts can lead to severe problems for your corneal health and overall sight. The cornea requires constant oxygen and the occasional flow of liquids from your glands to clean out debris and bacteria. Leaving contacts in overnight cuts off some oxygen flow to your corneas as well as tears created by your glands to filter out bacteria. Even within a short period, someone can experience dryness, irritation, or pain from dry and dirty contacts. Infection Prolonged use of contact lenses can lead to a variety of infections in the cornea. In severe cases, things like a corneal ulcer can form. The corneal ulcer forms from accumulated bacteria on the eye and can cause irritation, vision impairment, blindness, and strange sensations in the eye. Conjunctivitis or pink eye is a common infection that can be caused by dirty contact lenses. In rare cases, a person can experience Acanthamoeba keratitis which is an infection of the cornea from a single-celled organism, or ameba that invades the...
Alzheimer’s and Vision Loss

Alzheimer’s and Vision Loss

A recent study suggests that there may be a link between degenerative eye diseases and detection of Alzheimer’s in patients. Degenerative eye diseases and Alzheimer’s are not directly related but this experiment gives insight into identifying cognitive diseases before they come to fruition. The University of Washington School of Medicine, The UW School of Nursing, and the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Institute reported results on an experiment that has been conducted for over five years. The experiment included about four thousand individuals all over the age of 65 who had no known signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Over five years of observation, almost eight hundred individuals were diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. The experiment concluded that individuals with degenerative eye diseases were forty to fifty percent more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than patients with no known prior eye diseases. “The main message from this study is that ophthalmologists should be more aware of the risks of developing dementia for people with these eye conditions and primary care doctors seeing patients with these eye conditions might be more careful on checking on possible dementia or memory loss.” – Dr. Cecilia Lee, lead researcher. Alzheimer’s disease is on the rise across the US and doctors are finding ways to potentially catch the onset of the disease before official diagnosis to be proactive with treatment plans. This is one experiment, of many others that have been conducted in previous years, that is adding to the piling evidence that diseases of the eye could be a potential precursor to degenerative diseases occurring in the brain. A main factor in the experiment was observing the...
Foods to Help Maintain Eye Health

Foods to Help Maintain Eye Health

Maintaining a healthy diet is, unsurprisingly, and important habit that individuals of all ages should embrace. A lesser known diet that often falls by the wayside is one that directly addresses eye health. For those who may be unfamiliar with which foods exactly benefit the human eye, this list can be extremely helpful. Red Peppers Raw red peppers contain the most vitamin C per calorie than any other vegetable, which helps blood vessels in the eye, in addition to decreasing the risk of cataracts. It’s important to note that heat actively breakdowns the compounds found in vitamin C, so prioritize raw vegetables when you can. Seeds and Nuts Simply an ounce of sunflower seeds and almonds alike contain nearly half the amount of vitamin E that the USDA recommends an average adult consume per day. Vitamin E, in addition to several other nutrients, has been shown to slow down age-related macular degeneration; an eye disease that results in loss of vision. The risk of cataracts may also decrease with added vitamin E, which is also plentiful in hazelnuts, legumes, and even peanut butter. Dark Greens The health benefits that come from dark green vegetables are seemingly never ending. Those like kale, spinach, collard greens, and lettuce are rich in both vitamins E and C. Lutein and zeaxanthin are two carotenoids that can help greatly in lowering your risk of several different eye diseases. These are essentially organic pigments produced by plants that are similar in structure to vitamin A. Lean Meats Lean meats like chicken, pork, and oysters contain zinc, which pulls vitamin A from your liver up to...